26% planning a holiday abroad for September, survey reveals

Over a quarter of Irish people are planning a holiday abroad for September, while 22% are planning an overseas trip for October, according to a survey by online travel agent Click&Go.

Nearly 2,500 people between the ages of 18 and 65 took part in the survey, with the majority of respondents aged 35 or older.

Sun holidays were the most popular choice for those looking to book a foreign trip, the research reveals.

“Essentially, people want to start travelling again, the majority from September onwards, provided they know where they stand in terms of restrictions,” said Paul Hackett, CEO of Click&Go.

“Any delays to easing travel restrictions will further impact the travel industry, as Irish customers will be forced to wait to book their holidays, which will drastically slow the recovery of the Irish travel sector,” he said.

Meanwhile, separate research commissioned by Europcar Mobility Group Ireland reveals that 56% of people are still choosing to holiday at home this year.

The research shows that 60% haven’t taken a break since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Of those who did holiday in Ireland, the length of stay was relatively short with the majority taking between two and three days.

42% said they spent less than €500 on their trip.

In contrast, 45% of those booking a staycation this year said they plan to spend up to €1,000.

Just under a quarter plan to spend more than that.

The research also indicates that the pandemic has influenced how people plan to travel this summer, with 62% saying they will not use public transport.

This suggests that more people will be using a car for their holiday – and Europcar Mobility Group Ireland said that with one in ten saying their current car is unsuitable for taking on a staycation, many will be considering renting a car.

According to the research, the west coast is the most popular holiday destination in Ireland, followed by the south coast.

Article Source – 26% planning a holiday abroad for September, survey reveals – RTE – Gill Stedman

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